Judge allows critical DNA evidence in Marcotte murder case

A judge on Tuesday dismissed a petition to suppress DNA evidence collected from a man suspected of killing a New York Google employee who disappeared in 2016 during a race in Massachusetts, which means he can now be admitted to trial. Angelo Colon-Ortiz pleaded not guilty to murder in the death of 27-year-old Vanessa Marcotte in the city of Princeton, about 40 miles west of Boston. police in March 2017 were obtained illegally because the police did not have a warrant, because a consent form in Spanish explaining the rights of Colon-Ortiz was not correctly translated, and because the police in ‘State did not send a soldier with adequate Spanish translation skills to his home. Judge Janet Kenton-Walker said in her ruling, even though there was a problem with the form: “Considering all of the circumstances in this case, the consent form, as well as the interview with the police, con veyed “that they were looking for a DNA sample. Colon-Ortiz’s lawyer, Eduardo Masferrer, said he was” disappointed “with the judge’s decision and may appeal. Colon-Ortiz barely understood the soldier’s translation, Masferrer said.” The court made it clear that the form raised “serious concerns” and was the product of a negligence “, and contained” a litany of errors “, Masferrer said in a statement. And although the form is largely “confusing and absurd to a non-English speaker,” according to prosecutors, Colon-Ortiz’s DNA matched DNA found under Marcotte’s fingernails. Marcotte was visiting her mother in 2016 when she did not return from a race. His body was found a few hours later in the nearby woods. Colon-Ortiz was working as a delivery driver at the time of the murder and was familiar with Princeton and the surrounding area, prosecutors said.

A judge on Tuesday dismissed a petition to suppress DNA evidence collected from a man suspected of killing a Google employee in New York City who disappeared in 2016 during a race in Massachusetts, which means he can now be admitted to trial.

Angelo Colon-Ortiz has pleaded not guilty to murder in the death of 27-year-old Vanessa Marcotte in the city of Princeton, about 40 miles west of Boston.

Colon-Ortiz’s lawyers argued in their petition that the DNA samples taken from their client by state police in March 2017 were obtained illegally because the police did not have a warrant because a form consent in Spanish explaining Colon-Ortiz’s rights was not correctly translated, and because the state police did not send a soldier with adequate skills in Spanish translation to his home.

In her decision, Judge Janet Kenton-Walker said that while there was a problem with the form, “given all of the circumstances in this case, the consent form, as well as the interview with the police, said “they were looking for a DNA sample. .

Colon-Ortiz’s lawyer Eduardo Masferrer said he was “disappointed” with the judge’s decision and could appeal.

Colon-Ortiz barely understood the soldier’s translation, Masferrer said.

“The court made it clear that the form raised” serious concerns “and was the product of negligence,” and contained “a litany of errors,” Masferrer said in a statement.

Hearst property

Angelo Colon-Ortiz has pleaded not guilty to a murder charge in the 2016 death of Vanessa Marcotte in Princeton, Massachusetts.

And although the form was largely “confusing and absurd to a non-English speaker,” the court ruled that because one sentence was clear, his client would understand the rights he was waiving, he said.

Colon-Ortiz’s DNA matches DNA found under Marcotte’s fingernails, prosecutors say.

Marcotte was visiting her mother in 2016 when she did not return from a race. His body was found a few hours later in the nearby woods.

Colon-Ortiz was working as a delivery driver at the time of the murder and was familiar with Princeton and the surrounding area, prosecutors said.

Edward K. Thompson